TSCA, Amended – One Year of Progress

Recently, Green Seal’s standards development team attended a conference on the Frank R. Lautenberg Chemical Safety for the 21st Century Act, which celebrated its 1-year anniversary. We greatly enjoyed the candid conversations between the heavy hitters: government officials, members of Congress, representatives from industry, and environmental advocates.

The bill was signed into law on June 22, 2016 by President Obama, and was widely proclaimed a success.

Soon after the signing, the usual political chatter began: cheers (a rare show of bipartisanship!), grumbles (the law was decades overdue), jitters (could the EPA handle the ambitious time lines?), shrugs and yawns (too many compromises). We, in Green Seal’s Washington, DC’s headquarters, sometimes enjoy the political opera, especially since we remain happily seated in the mezzanine. I, and my friends in the DC environmental community, were heartened by the news: the EPA now had greater authority, strict time lines for progress, and dependable funding sources for implementing effective chemical regulation.

Continue reading “TSCA, Amended – One Year of Progress”

An Inside Look: UCSB-Bren School Study Quantifies GHG Reductions of Green Seal-Certified Hotels in L.A.

In a market full of different certifiers, it is important for hotels to distinguish between a green-washed standard and one with real environmental benefits.

In a market full of different certifiers, it is important for hotels to distinguish between a green-washed standard and one with real environmental benefits.

Green Seal recently collaborated with the Bren School of Environmental Sciences and Management at the University of California, Santa Barbara, on a year-long study to quantify the environmental benefits (in terms of greenhouse gas [GHG] reductions) for hotels in the City of Los Angeles that are certified under Green Seal’s hotel standard (GS-33).

Let’s go back a few years to get the full picture…. in 2008, the City of Los Angeles recognized the role hotels can play in reducing the city’s overall GHG emissions, and created the Los Angeles Green Lodging Program (LAGLP) to meet its Climate Action Plan goals.  Green Seal was selected as the official certifier for the LAGLP, which now has 7 certified participating hotels including: JW Marriott Los Angeles LIVE, Hilton Universal City, Hilton Los Angeles Airport, Sheraton Gateway, Crowne Plaza, Westin Bonaventure, and Westin Los Angeles Airport. Los Angeles now has more Green Seal-certified hotels than any city in the nation (over 6 million square feet certified), with a number of additional hotels in the process of getting certified.  Until the recent Bren Study, however, neither the City nor Green Seal had a quantitative metric of the environmental benefits of the LAGLP.

The Bren team used electricity consumption data from 6 certified hotels in Los Angeles, and found that on average:

  • entering at Bronze level saw 2.8% reduction in GHG emissions,
  • those progressing to Silver saw an added reduction of 8.8% (hotels entering directly at Silver would see a 2.8% + 8.8% = 11.6% reduction)
  • those progressing to Gold saw a further reduction of 18.2% (hotels entering directly at Gold would see a 11.6% + 18.2% = 29.8% reduction)

The Bren team took this study one step further to see how Green Seal certification benefits a hotel itself. They conducted surveys of over 1000 participants and found that consumers were willing to pay $6.50 more per night for hotels with demonstrated sustainability measures.

A case study by the Bren team showed that meeting the most basic requirement in the GS-33 standard of upgrading lighting (mandated by the Bronze level), can reduce a hotel’s emissions by a total of 1,066 MT CO2 annually, which is equivalent to emissions from 225 passenger vehicles driven for a year. Furthermore, these replacements reaped financial benefits as well: over a 20-year project cash flow period, the hotel would see $1,562,157 in cumulative savings from avoided utility costs.  Hotels can target lighting upgrades as “low-hanging fruit” that yield higher benefits than costs.

 

Finally, the Bren team also created a user-friendly Excel-based tool that can be used by an individual hotel to calculate its GHG reductions and financial savings from different energy and electricity reduction projects undertaken because of Green Seal certification. This tool can be used by hotel managers and engineers to calculate their GHG and long-term financial savings.

As hotels across the globe increasingly embrace green practices, it is important for the lodging industry to pursue practices with real environmental benefits. Hotels can be one of the most energy and GHG intensive buildings, as they tend to keep lights on throughout hallways at night or run thermostats even when there are no occupants in the room. Green Seal’s GS-33 Hotels and Lodging Properties standard requires hotels to upgrade their energy intensive equipment and to integrate sustainability practices in their daily operations.

The Bren study strengthens the findings of an independent study by Washington State University, which stated that:  “The single most important thing is to become certified by an independent and credible agency such as Green Seal and Leadership in Energy & Environmental Design (LEED), the major certification programs in the lodging industry.”


 

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Type 1 Ecolabels – An International Perspective

In 1994, Green Seal was one of the original founders of an international organization for Type 1 Ecolabels – the Global Ecolabelling Network (GEN). Although GEN has been a major advocate and motivator for its members (ecolabelling programs around the world), many in Green Seal’s community are unfamiliar with GEN.

To provide a general introduction to GEN, Green Seal hosted a webinar on January 12th that featured presentations from the Chair of GEN, Bjorn-Erik Lonn, and from representatives of Good Environmental Choice Australia (GECA) and the Nordic Ecolabel.

Check out our recordings of the presentations below.

“The idea is to clearly identify the environmental leadership products in the market, help consumers to find them, and enhance the consumer confidence that the product actually is more environmentally preferable, therefore fighting greenwashing.” – Bjorn-Erik Lonn, Chair of the Global Ecollabeling Network (GEN).

“For businesses, an ecolabel is an effective way of measuring true environmental performance, the whole lifecycle of the product and communicating these credentials to consumers. For government, ecolabels are a tool to encourage behavior change in both consumers and producers to long-term sustainability. ” – Shaila Divakarla, Standards and Technical Manager at GECA.

In 2017, Green Seal intends to host several related webinars that will dive into the purpose, processes, and positive market effects of Type 1 Ecolabels. Stay tuned for announcements of a future webinar that make take place in April 2017.

Questions or comments about this webinar? Email us anytime at Standards@greenseal.org.

Be Recognized for Your Sustainability Leadership in 2017

By Mark Stanland, Vice President of Client Services

Once again, it’s that time when we talk about how quickly the year has gone. This often proves to be very true as we get busier with the demands of the current business environment. As 2016 comes to an end, here are a few questions I would encourage Green Seal clients to consider: What are you doing to promote your sustainability story? Are you taking full advantage of the resources available to you to market and promote your Green Seal-certified products and services? Green Seal offers tools and programs to make this easier for our clients. Here are three things that can be done in the New Year for a successful 2017. Continue reading “Be Recognized for Your Sustainability Leadership in 2017”

Seeking Your Feedback on Our Most Successful Standards

Over the past twenty-seven years, Green Seal has published dozens of environmental leadership standards and certified over 4,000 products. We have achieved the most success over these years in the cleaning product industry, and have invested greatly in helping manufacturers green their products. About one-third of our 32 active standards define environmental leadership for specific types of cleaning products.

For cleaning product manufacturers and for institutional purchasers, Green Seal is a well-known product certifier. Our services are trusted and respected, and the Green Seal Certification Mark is a widely recognized symbol that shows that a product has been evaluated for both performance and environmental leadership. A key facet of our success has been that our certification process is transparent and scientific; certification is based on our accurate and publicly available environmental leadership standards.

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Earth Day with Airlie

By Mac Clevenger, Green Seal’s Marketing & Outreach Associate

This year I had the pleasure of celebrating Earth Day with (and at) one of Green Seal’s certified clients, Airlie. Airlie has been certified to the standard GS-33 Hotels and Lodging Properties since 2004. Certification to the standard GS-33 represents THE highest level of commitment to human and environmental health in the hospitality industry.

Earth Day is near and dear to both Airlie and Green Seal. After first introducing the idea for Earth Day at Airlie, Senator Gaylord Nelson selected Denis Hayes the first CEO and Chair of Green Seal – to organize the very first Earth Day in 1970. Following the success of the first Earth Day, Denis founded the Earth Day Network which eventually propelled the holiday to the international stage in 1990, organizing events in 141 nations. And now, at least according to Denis, Earth Day is “the largest secular holiday in the world, celebrated by more than a billion people every year.”

Continue reading “Earth Day with Airlie”

A Window into a Credible Approach to Sustainability

 

At the biggest Earth Day celebration in the world, Earth Day Texas 2016, two sustainability leaders—a nonprofit ecolabel and a windows manufacturer, discussed why consumers rely on them to make smart purchasing decisions. Green Seal’s President & CEO Dr. Arthur Weissman and Renewal by Andersen of Dallas’ General Manager Chris Pound shared the stage on April 23rd in Dallas, Texas and discussed the power of a credible ecolabel. Continue reading “A Window into a Credible Approach to Sustainability”

An Interview with Green Seal’s Own Farmer, Pt. 2

 

Think you know about organic certification? Chelsea Chandler, Green Seal Environmental Scientist and Certification Project Manager, explains why she pursued third party certification for her CSA farm. If you haven’t already, read our previous blog post, in which Chelsea introduces us to her farm.

Tell us about your farm’s latest achievement.

This past fall, my farm, Plowshares & Prairie Farm, achieved USDA organic certification through MOSA (Midwest Organic Services Association, Inc.), a USDA accredited certification agency. Continue reading “An Interview with Green Seal’s Own Farmer, Pt. 2”

An Interview with Green Seal’s Own Farmer, Pt.1

 

Explore the smart and practical world of a CSA farm. Chelsea Chandler, Environmental Scientist and Certification Project Manager at Green Seal, takes us through her experience of managing a CSA farm outside Madison, Wisconsin.

How did you get into farming?

I grew up in the San Francisco Bay Area and was pretty removed from farming beyond some backyard gardening and a great appreciation for all the fresh food grown in my home state.

I had been a member of a few different Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) farms over the years, and then really just dove into farming. I learned how to drive a tractor at my godfather’s grass-fed beef operation and farm stay, which my partner, Scott, and I visited frequently while living in Seattle. Farm stays, a growing phenomenon in the United States, offer travelers an opportunity to vacation in and experience a rural farm setting. Scott had a little more experience doing a work share for a CSA farm outside of Seattle.

Scott and I started talking about pairing our sometimes more abstract environmental policy work with the tangible work of growing food that is good for people and the environment. I’m enthusiastic about creating a model for sustainable food production and consumption and empowering local communities to adopt healthier and more sustainable lifestyles. Continue reading “An Interview with Green Seal’s Own Farmer, Pt.1”